RED WHARF BAY
TRAETH COCH

"Be fleet of foot."

I do not diminish Red Wharf Bay by suggesting that it is a platform from which to view the beauty of the broader bay, because that’s what it is really.  Unless you’ve come to wave at sailors who got the tides wrong.


TIDE IN KNOTS?

Red Wharf Bay seems to only have two states: Tide In or Tide Out.

The pictures on this page are obviously Tide In. May I refer you to have a look later at the 'Tide Times' page on this website's vertical menu down to your left. It might prove helpful.

The tide comes in rapidly and if you fancy taking a trek across the bay, rather than around it or have got your timings wrong in bringing your boat back to this haven then you'll wish you had taken heed of my advice. 



As is most of the coastline of the beautiful Isle of Anglesey, Red Wharf Bay (or Traeth Coch – ‘Red Beach’) is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty that is miles across from the hamlet that is known as Red Wharf Bay to Llanddona Beach on the other shore.

I understand that the Bay area extends to around 10 square miles (what that is in Euros, I don’t know).

It's a contentious point - or is that a moot point - about where Red Wharf Bay begins and where it ends.

I am of the view that it begins at the lighthouse at Penmon Point (Trwyn Du) and stretches westwards along Llanddona Beach, Wern y Wylan, Pentraeth, then north toward Benllech and further to Traeth Bychan beach.




RED WHARF BAY ICE-CREAM CHALLENGE

Now there's an interesting point worth considering here. It is possible to hop along this coast from one excellent ice cream vendor to another from Llanddona Beach just across the bay here and all the way up to Lligwy Beach.

Go to Llanddona Beach face Red Wharf Bay hamlet and turn left all of a sudden and keep going along the Isle of Anglesey Coastal Path. Just keep following the signs through Moelfre and past the Hindlea and Royal Charter monuments





RED WHARF BAY & FOOD


Gradually, over the many decades of my life, the Ship Inn has grown in stature not only in recognition of its fortunate location, but its food and its very traditional ambiance and welcome.

It was a very beautiful day when I visited and each table in front of the Ship Inn was occupied.

I don't need to give you any contact details for the Ship Inn, just take a look at the photograph below and that should guide you.





Red Wharf Bay is known for many things. Some people think of it as a point to pass through when you circumnavigate Anglesey on the Anglesey Coastal Path, others think of it as a place to come and park their yacht.

Others know it for having one of the fastest tides in Britain, while others still - most people, in fact - think of the food and welcome that awaits them.

When I was a child, the bay was only famous for one pub, the Ship Inn.

I remember many a summer evening in the 1960s, Dad would drive there with us children in the back. He would park in the car park in front of The Ship and disappear into the pub for a while and come back out with a pint of beer for himself and a glass of a little something for Mam, which had a cherry on a stick in it.

He would offer mam her drink and place his pint on top of the car and reach into his coat pockets and bring out three packets of the plain crisps that we loved so much - blue salt bag and all.

Cheese and Onion wasn't even a gleam in some mad food chemist's eye yet.




As I mentioned above, there are two culinary reasons for visiting Red Wharf Bay, one is obviously emblazoned above, then there is the other depicted below, namely then Boat House Restaurant.




I do not receive any sponsorship and so add much information on Anglesey-Hidden-Gem.com to make sure that you have as much information as you need to hand to have a lovely time on your stay on Anglesey.

While the Ship Inn is atmospheric and distinctly reflects its history, The Boathouse in Red Wharf Bay is more recent and lighter and is also home to wonderful food and a welcome. Easy things to write, but more so when true. The Boathouse website is https://www.boathouseredwharfbay.co.uk/




THE ISLE OF ANGLESEY COASTAL PATH


Those who are serious walkers of the Coastal path generally arrive at Red Wharf Bay from the Llanddona end. These are obvious by the walking sticks, kitbags and 'Can-Do' attitude written all over their sun and wind ravaged faces.

The rest of us generally arrive from Benllech a few miles to the north and probably had an ice-cream at Dan Dare's before setting off twenty minutes earlier.

Whether you have bimbled along the Anglesey Coastal Path from Benllech or struggled here having faced down outrageous fortune and nasty poodles from the Pentraeth end, a pint and an ice cream awaits you all.

The Anglesey Coastal Path is clearly signposted and can be picked up at the signpost at the bottom of the hill road leading down to the bay.



'Free'-dom to Walk the Isle of Anglesey Coastal Path

This evening (July 6) I picked up a piece of paper on the Coastal path at Church Bay heading north. It was such a  small piece of paper that I reckon it might have slipped out of someone's pocket quite unnoticed.

I discovered that the piece of paper was both indicative and significant because it was a bus ticket for a journey that cost nothing. 

Many people who walk the Anglesey Coastal Path these days are of an age when they can avail themselves of Free Bus Passes. 

For some people, it literally costs nothing to travel to and to walk stretches of the coastal path. Take a bus to the closest point, walk a stretch and then head back for the main road and the nearest free bus ride home or to the car.

Sometimes age brings more than wisdom and experience.











MARKED BY APPALLING MARITIME TRAGEDIES
The Royal Charter & HM Submarine Thetis

Two of the worst tragedies to strike at this stretch of Anglesey's coastline occurred in 1859 and 1939:

In October 1859, The Royal Charter from Australia and bound for Liverpool was struck by 104 mph hurricane force winds sailing around Anglesey and came to grief driven onto the rocks just off the coastal village of Moelfre

When the disaster was over only 39 people survived. The remainder, probably numbering over 450, died and hundreds of bodies were discovered washed ashore along the coast as far north as Amlwch and as far south as Pentraeth and Red Wharf Bay. The Royal Charter disaster created a few tales about a number of suddenly wealthy Anglesey families.


anglesey-hidden-gem.com - Sculpture to Royal Charter Maritime DisasterSculpture to Royal Charter Maritime Disaster

Please Click Here for more ...



On June 1st of the summer of 1939 HM Submarine Thetis was out for its first sea trials in the Liverpool Bay and failed to return to the surface after it submerged. Ninety-nine souls were lost and only four survived. The Thetis was brought to the sands of Traeth Bychan (probably the northernmost point of Red Wharf Bay) to recover the bodies. I will write more on the history of The Thetis on another page.

In the meantime, have a look at the Wikipedia pages on The Thetis Disaster. Click Here...



Invasion at Wern y Wylan, Llanddona

Last year I visited Wern y Wylan Beach - which is to the right of Llanddona Beach as you look from Red Wharf Bay - on a secret mission and had a conversation with a very nice gentleman who was waiting for his wife to return to their vehicle from exhausting their dog.

It was one of those moments of synchronicity when neither of us could remember the name of the Thetis; however, to  both our relief we managed to remember.

The gentleman, who turned out to be Sir Richard Buckley, reminded me of another feature of the bay as seen from Wern y Wylan and that is the short stumps of telegraph poles along the beach at a distance. Apparently, they were there to discourage a marine landing by an enemy.



LOCAL FACILITES & SHOPS

For your normal shopping needs then you will have to head elsewhere. Nearest and best served centre for vittles' is Benllech. And for petrol and diesel it is Pentraeth.

Where is each village relative to Red Wharf Bay? Easy, drive up to the main road again. Turn right for Benllech and turn left for Pentraeth.

Please take care turning onto the main road:

This is a straight road and people have been known to speed. Look after yourself. 

Click Here for Benllech Facilities.





Anglesey WindsurfingAnglesey Windsurfing


SURFING, WINDSURFING
& KITE-SURFING


It is far too shallow and sheltered for waves to build up at Red Wharf Bay and the tide is in and out so quickly that you will be chewing beach sandwich before you know it.

In the immediate locality, surfing is completely out of the questions. However, windsurfing and probably kite-surfing is possible for beginners right across the bay at Llanddona Beach.


N.B. When I tell you that Llanddona Beach is easy to get to, you will of course know that I am lying. Two very steep hills, narrow roads, blind corners and usually some Charlie in a Chelsea Tractor windows closed, full of kids and smoking a cigar speeding up or downhill at you.

Wear your Joo Janx Peril-Sensitive Glasses to ensure a happy journey.


Enjoy this seaside hamlet for what it is: just a delightful little village and a fabulous coastal path.

For some good SURFING, WINDSURFING AND KITE-SURFING action in this area:

  • Either, head a few miles down south to LLIGWY BEACH for excellent conditions when the NW or NE have been blowing for a few days.
  • Or, you can head North a few miles to TRAETH BYCHAN.





BOAT LAUNCHING AND REGISTRATION

You'll undoubtedly notice the number of sailing boats, jet-skis and power boats playing up and down this pleasant coastline.

The County Council requires you to register powerboats over a certain horse power and also lists the required qualifications.

Please CLICK HERE for all the above information and about launching fees on other Anglesey beaches and slipways.






PETS ON THE BEACH

• No major prohibition on dogs at Red Wharf Bay, but please keep them on a leash - Unlike Crazy Fido here.

• However, there are Seasonal Prohibitions on dogs on certain Anglesey beaches.

• Always bring a doggie poo-bag with you because the little dears can't always help themselves.

Sandy Beach Speeding Doggie

Imagine specific matter oozing from between your tanning and sandy toes.

Imagine a worse scenario; it’s your child.

• The main concern regarding dogs on Anglesey beaches is a health issue. Doggie poo can blind for life.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT DOG RESTRICTIONS ON ANGLESEY BEACHES PLEASE CLICK HERE.







GETTING TO RED WHARF BAY

  • Travel south From Benllech square for about a mile and a half on the A5025 coast road.
  • After leaving the village take the first left. For future reference, please note that the house on the turning and above the road on the left turning is an old Anglesey windmill that has been luxuriously converted.
  • Travel down the road until you encounter a sharp right turning and a junction to your left. Take the turning to the left and follow the road down.

  • From Menai Bridge - Pentraeth drive down the hill and up the other side through Pentraeth passing the garden centre on your left and further on the Bull on your right. Proceed out of the village until you arrive at a ninety-degree corner to your right (usually someone is selling Anglesey potatoes in the lay-by on your left here).
  • Follow the road around to your right and straight on for about just over half a mile and you'll see a very wide turning down to your right. Take this.
  • Drive right through the top of the hamlet until you pass a knick-knack shop on your right. Take the right turning down to Red Wharf Bay about twenty yards ahead. Don't take the turning down right by the shop.

N.B. Parking is very limited.




CONTACT ME

I would love to hear from you about your visit to Red Wharf Bay and Anglesey. Especially if you enjoyed the Anglesey Coastal Path and a walk up and down the coast.

Maybe you have questions that you want to ask before you get here.

Maybe you are one of those visitors who has been visiting Anglesey for decades.

Please tell me what makes Moelfre a really special place for you.

Maybe you have special advice - or even warnings.

Please feel free to share filling in the form below.  


Do get in touch

Do you have a great story about this to share or a question to ask? Yes? Then please write it in the box below.


Return from Red Wharf Bay to ANGLESEY EASTERN BEACHES.

Return to HOME PAGE.

Visit Llanallgo Royal Charter Church.

More about The Royal Charter Disaster.

The Royal Charter Sculpture


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