My Anglesey Connection and Washi Bach

by Mike Turner
(Shaw)

I have recently returned from a visit to my ancestral area on Anglesey and reflected on the massive changes in Beaumaris so many restaraunts

and expensive shops.

This made me mindful of such basic lives as Washi Bach.

I met up with a friend who grew up in Cemaes Bay she had many recollections of Washi Bach from the 50,s and 60,s.

She would spy him quite often as she was taken to school or shopping and was told to take care or Washi would frighten her - You know how parents would.

She commented that rumours included that Washi was a well educated man from a good background to the extent that he had learned Welsh.

My brother who lives in Italy also remembers him in those tranquil times living at Nain's.

Best regards

Mike

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Apr 27, 2012
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Washi Bach
by: Jean


Hi Wil

I also remember Washi Bach coming to Llangefni around the 1960s. My mother used to give him crusty bread and she would give him tea in his tin mug.

I remember him as a big man with black hair. He used to wear a few coats that made him look bigger. He walked with a large stick and a huge bag.

We were told not to speak to him as he was considered to be a little mad. I remember passing him once and he looked at me but said nothing.

I think my mother felt sorry for him and she used to tell us that he was an old soldier. He used to turn up one day,stayed around the area for a while and then left until the following year.

I would have liked to know where he came from and what happened to him.

Jean




Hi Jean

Thanks for adding to our anecdotal social knowledge of Washi Bach.

Everyone who's been in touch shares a similar tale, albeit with different geography of the Island. I hope you'll have read about him in Amlwch and Malltraeth.

Please scour the other messages on this page because in there you'll find that others, including my own Great Grandmother at Glanrhyd, Llynfaes, used to give him large slabs of bread with a thik layer of homemade butter.

Williams the Farmer at Felin Graig used to let him stay in the barn.

There were many old soldiers about damaged by the First World War, which is why many tramps found themselves greeted at homes that had gone to war themselves.

The Amlwch tale offers a sad ending to his journey. It turns out that he showed a book to an Amlwch gentleman revealing that he had worked on a ship of the White Star Lines and was probably from the Rhutun area.

It is said that this sad soul contracted TB and was found and taken to the hospice in Conwy where he later died.

No-one seems to know any more than this. Btu we didn't even know this when we began.

Thank you so very much for getting in touch. If you remember more then there's an eager audience around the country (and around the world) who care to know.

Have a lovely weekend. Saturday and Sunday are looking good for Anglesey.

Wil

Dec 07, 2011
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Mr.W.Bach.
by: Anonymous

HI Wil

One thing I recall, come to think of it, Mr. W.Bach never swore.

He had that Holyhead, or Menai Bridge type accent. As a boy, I did actually talk to him in around 1960 - give-or-take.

A victim of innadequate, post-war care. Shame on us.

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