Hello from a Proud Scot with Anglesey blood in her veins

by Liz
(North of Glasgow)

Hello,


My great grandparents (both Williamses!) migrated north to Glasgow in the late 1800s. My great grandfather was Owen Williams, a copper miner from Pengorffwysfa and my great grandmother was Winifred Williams (maiden and married surname) from Amlwch.

I paid my first visit to Anglesey a couple of years ago and found it heavenly.

It was magical to walk in the footsteps of my ancestors and to see the sights they would have seen.

LIZ

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Feb 17, 2011
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Pengorphwysfa
by: Wil

Hi Liz

I've just found Y Wern on Google Map, but it's a small private bungalow in a very small estate. Behind this I can see a farm and I guess that this might well be Wern Farm.

The shop is right on the junction. The little terrace with Capel Shiloh at the other end. After my Aunty Elin left there in the 1940s I think it was run by someone called Herbert. First name or surname I don't know. Directly opposite the Wern house is a little council estate which is named after him.

I imagine that you've driven the road up past Y Wern and around the headland that overlooks Point Linus Lighthouse. Its a narrow, steep and nervy little road and the views are fabulous on a sunny day, past Puffin Island and all the way east to Llandudno's Great Orme.

There is a real sense of ancientness to the ruined farm buildings along the road, as if they have become contaminated by an ancient Celtic curse.

Still, it's a beautiful stretch of road to drive along and the Anglesey Coastal Path below is a great place to spot Gray Seals and just chill out.

A glorious place to visit and I'll see if I can get some photos for you this weekend if the weather's good.

I'll be writing link pages to my new Amlwch page soon and wonder if you have any family stories that you'd care to share.

I'd do my best to get the right photos to fit your article.

Take care

Nos Da
(Good Night)

Wil

Feb 16, 2011
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Celtic languages.
by: 'Drew

Scots-Welsh. The word 'Strath Clyde'- a place in Scotland, is a twist on the Welsh 'Ystrad Clyd'.

Derbyshire has a history to be seen where likewise Welsh rulers held land, in the Bakewell- Great Longstone area.

Owen Williams of Caergeiliog, Anglesey, was my Great Grandfather. I believe he was a Blacksmith.

'Black Lake' in Welsh is 'Llyn Ddu'. Note the 'Du' and 'Lyn' for it appears in the Viking language for DubLin, a Viking name for the Irish city, meaning also 'Black Lake' Du b'lyn.

'Drew
Alaska




Diolch 'Drew

Very instructional. No culture or language stands aloof of exteranal influence. Commerce, you think?

I'll be in touch with some local news for you and Gordon.

Wil

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